The Aishworya “Children’s Home”

Late yesterday, ChoraChori-Nepal took a call from Nepal’s Central Child Welfare Board (CCWB) asking for support in its raid and rescue operation on the Aishworya “Children’s Home” in Kathmandu.

This is a developing story, but it seems that the authorities were notified following a complaint from a foreigner about neglected and unsupervised children at the centre. CCWB acted immediately and asked a number of NGOs, including ChoraChori, to help with rescuing 122 children from three premises that were being used by Aishworya.

Unsurprisingly, during the rescue the “management” of the home was nowhere to be found. The children were indeed in a bad way, many of them covered in scabies. It seems a lot of the children originate from Nepal’s deprived Humla District in the far northwest. Allegedly the Aishworya people were asking for contributions of NPR30,000 to NPR100,000 (£200 to £700) to have their children “cared for” and educated in Kathmandu at the expense of naïve but well-intentioned foreigners. This form of child trafficking and exploitation is just one aspect of Nepal’s orphan business that the authorities are now making steps towards dismantling, including through a new Children’s Act that prioritises alternative care arrangements with children’s homes becoming a last resort.

For now, the rescued children are being looked after at a number of centres by the NGOs Forget me Not, CWIN, Voice of Children, THIS and ChoraChori. We have admitted 16 boys and 4 girls, all under the age of 10, to our Children’s Refuge and Rehabilitation Centre which will be a stepping stone to family reintegration and support.

Please think twice before you support any orphanage in Nepal, however reputable it might seem. There are a few notable exceptions, but most so called orphanages are income generation centres for the greedy people who operate them. The Nepal government is now doing what it can but the orphan business can only be dismantled when it is denied the oxygen of Western donations.

ChoraChori rescues 26 Nepalese boys from Bihar

On Good Friday, the 18th April 2019, ChoraChori facilitated the rescue of 26 Nepalese boys from a children’s shelter in Bihar, north India.

The open border between Nepal and India makes it easy for children to be trafficked or for them to voluntarily cross into India in search of opportunities. On the 27th March the Indian authorities intercepted a group of 26 teenage boys who were on their way to alleged employment opportunities in Chennai. Such transfer of children concerns the Nepal authorities for good reason. Why would Nepalese children be offered employment when there are no shortage of potential employees in Chennai itself? The truth of the matter is that it is much easier to exploit children who are foreign nationals – one of the sad fundamentals of child trafficking.

All of the boys hailed from Districts in south central Nepal. The boys had been placed in a children’s shelter at Sitamadhi in Bihar (pictured) with the request that the Nepalese authorities arrange their repatriation and reunification with their families. Accordingly, Nepal’s Central Child Welfare Board (CCWB) immediately contacted District Child Welfare Boards in Dhanusha, Mahottari, Sarlahi and Siraha Districts to trace the boys’ families. This being achieved quickly, CCWB then requested that the Sitamadhi District Child Protection Unit hand over the boys to authorised persons. These were Sanjiv Mahato (CCWB), Saroj Kumar Ray (an independent social worker appointed by Dhanusha Child Welfare Board) and Shailaja CM, the Operational Director of ChoraChori-Nepal (right of picture). The reunification was effected quickly on Good Friday, with ChoraChori-Nepal covering the costs, including the hire of the bus. The boys have since been reunited with their families, relieved to be back home after their month-long detention. See this press report on the rescue.

Well done to Shailaja and our staff lawyer, Sunita Karki, on their success and compliments to all other involved parties on this smooth operation. This latest rescue brings to 203 the number of displaced and trafficked children whose repatriation ChoraChori has facilitated since late 2015. We aim to open a boys’ hostel in Kathmandu later this year which will give the rescue programme a further boost.

Rape at an Indian children’s shelter

In our blog post of 30th April we reported on our rescue of three Nepali girls from an Indian children’s shelter at Muzaffarpur. This followed months of negotiation and three visits to overcome what seemed at the time to be insurmountable bureaucracy. Now we know the reason for this obstructive behaviour. As we suspected, the shelter had something to hide. According to a media report in today’s Times of India eight staff members have been arrested on charges of sexual abuse and rape. Two men, one of whom heads up the NGO that runs the shelter and the other a member of the local Child Welfare Committee, have been charged with rape. It will take time for the full scale of the horror to be revealed as there were 46 (Indian) minors at the shelter who will need to be interviewed and counselled by the Indian authorities. However, media reports elsewhere suggest that the female staff were complicit too, forcing girls into same-sex activity.

ChoraChori has rescued a total of six Nepali girls from this shelter over the past year, four of whom are still being supported at our children’s refuge and trauma management centre in Kathmandu. Sadly, this is unlikely to be an isolated case which explains why our cross-border rescue programme is so vitally important.

Please help us to continue what we do by donating through the button below.

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Rescue from Varanasi

Kamala (green) and her father being counselled by ChoraChori-Nepal refuge manager, Rita Mokhtan (centre).

Varanasi is famous throughout India as a focus for pilgrims and tourists alike. Indeed, with its 2,000 temples it is known as the spiritual capital of India. But the ChoraChori-Nepal field team has just been there for another reason; to bring a girl trafficking victim home.

Sixteen year old Kamala (name changed) arrived at our Kathmandu refuge at midnight three days ago. It was the end of a long journey that began at the start of last year. At that time she was living at home in Rautahat, a District in south-central Nepal. She and a number of girls had been in touch by mobile with a boy who was encouraging them to join him in Kathmandu. Only Kamala decided to run away and join him, enticed by his proposal of marriage.

But once in Kathmandu the boy locked her in a room while he went to work in a bag factory. Soon afterwards they travelled to Nawalparasi, another border District, where again the boy locked her up while he sold ice lollipops on the street. From there they crossed the border in Uttar Pradesh and ended up in Varanasi. At this point Kamala begged to return home but the boy beat her and left saying he would return with a bus ticket. He never came back. The local Child Welfare Committee found out about Kamala’s predicament and admitted her to a girls’ hostel. Then they contacted ChoraChori-Nepal asking for our help with repatriation.

We managed to trace Kamala’s family without too much difficulty and her father and uncle travelled with our staff member Pratap Titung to secure her release.  At our Kathmandu refuge we have conducted health checks and counselled the family. Initially Kamala’s parents were saying that they would not accept her back home. Instead she would stay with an uncle pending marriage as soon as possible. However they have now come around to accepting her back with them, recognising that the girl has been a victim rather than a delinquent. Our next step is to find the boy and bring him to justice as this has been a case of trafficking.

Sadly, this is a story we hear all to often, with vulnerable girls being tempted by false promises. ChoraChori-Nepal is the only Nepal-based organisation that goes into India to retrieve and reintegrate them, giving girls like Kamala a second chance.

 

Lost for words

Naresh back in his village with his uncle, grandmother and ChoraChori field staff Yogesh Dhami (left)

Lost for words

ChoraChori aims to return the children it rescues from India to their families. This makes for emotional reunions. When we reunited Naresh with his grandmother two weeks ago she was quite overwhelmed (see picture). Indeed, we believe it to be unprecedented for a Nepali grandmother to be lost for words.

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Naresh back in his village with his uncle, grandmother and ChoraChori field staff member Yogesh Dhami (left)

Village boredom

A range of push factors drive Nepali kids to run away from home and seek a better life in India. Often they are attempting to escape grinding rural poverty or domestic abuse. In Naresh’s case the push factor was boredom. His parents and three brothers had migrated to Karnataka, southwest India, when he was 11 years old. But Naresh decided to stay behind with his maternal grandparents as he wanted to study at the village school. After a year though this became too dull and one day he took what he thought would be his chance for a more interesting life. He “borrowed” his grandfather’s bicycle and set off on the pretext of selling firewood.

India

Naresh crossed the border at a place called Gaddachowki, not far from his home near Mahendranagar in the far west of Nepal. He told ChoraChori that no one at the Gaddachowki crossing point checks people who are riding bikes. Then he sold the firewood to buy some food, before cycling for two days straight to a town called Bareilly that lies about 100 km from the border. On his first night there he ate at a temple which was providing free food and slept on the streets. His second night’s food came courtesy of a Muslim festival that he stumbled upon. On the third day he sold the bicycle and used the money to board a train to Delhi.

En route Naresh stopped off at a place called Ambala where he worked as a gardener for about two weeks. He became bored there too so resumed his journey to Delhi. However the Indian NGO Salaam Baalak Trust spotted him arriving at the railway station and took him to a children’s shelter. He spent three months there before ChoraChori field staff came to his rescue in March 2016.

ChoraChori reunites him successfully

After Naresh’s grandmother finally found her words, she was able to share her delight at his return. Apparently Naresh’s father, who works in a metal factory in Karnataka, will be returning home soon to meet him. He’ll then decide whether or not to take Naresh back with him to rejoin his mother and siblings. Whatever happens, Naresh seems to have learned his lesson and is currently studying in the eighth grade, aspiring to become a doctor.

Child sponsorship

There are still 22 children remaining at the ChoraChori refuge in Kathmandu pending tracing of families and/or completing rehabilitation. If you can help us with a regular donation through child sponsorship please let me know on philip@chorachori.org.uk. Failing that, please help us with a one off donation towards our other facility, the newly built Child Trauma Management Centre, using the button below. All donations to his appeal are matched at 50%. In other words £10 becomes £15 with donations accepted in all major currencies.

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A ChoraChori home visit

Following up Bibash

Nepali boy Bibash with his parentsIn December 2015 ChoraChori repatriated fifteen year old Nepali boy Bibash Tamang along with 23 other children in a major child rescue operation.  Our field staff who reunited Bibash with his family the following January returned last week to see how he was getting along.

Why did he leave home?

Bibash’s family lives in Kanchanpur, the most westerly of Nepal’s 75 Districts. It takes 15 hours to get there by car, much longer by bus. His father, Durgalal, is blind while his mother, Phulmaya, is disabled through a leg deformity. Bibash told us that he became tired of his friends at school teasing him about his parents’ disabilities (Nepal can be a harsh place in this regard) so he left home to seek a better life in India. He crossed the border near his home at a spot that is a notorious smuggling spot. But his dreams came to an abrupt end when the Indian police picked him up to then spend several months in a dreadful Indian “children’s shelter”. ChoraChori’s intervention secured his freedom and return to Nepal shortly afterwards.

Why did ChoraChori return Bibash to his family?

Although Bibash’s parents are disabled and live in a small house they are not totally destitute by any means. For they own six khatta (2,028 square metres) of land which is farmed on their behalf as they are unable to till the land. This works under the Nepali Aadhiya system (aadhi means half) whereby the farmer and landowner divide the produce 50:50.  He also has a government disability allowance of 600 rupees (£4-5 per month) and supplements his income by acting as a “witch doctor” from time to time. We decided that with a 10,000 rupee (£80) grant from ChoraChori could support Bibash back into education. This is a much cheaper option than keeping him in our Kathmandu refuge. And of course he is back with his family where he really belongs.

How is he faring at school?

Bibash is currently studying in the eighth grade at the local Sri Durga Secondary School. His uncle, Dan Bir Moktan, happens to be one of his teachers. He tells us that Bibash has been very applied and one day aspires to join the British Army. He knows that to do that he’ll at least have to pass the 10th grade School Leaver’s Certificate (and a bit more besides!). But we will continue to support him up until this point at least.

Bibash’s father said to our field staff: “You have provided my son with a second chance at life. We are forever indebted to you. Like any parent, we do not expect anything from Bibash except for him to have a brighter future”.

Child sponsorship

Please consider helping a Nepali boy like Bibash, either at the refuge or back with their families, through our child sponsorship scheme. To find out more, just contact me on philip@chorachori.org.uk

 

Nepal’s lost children

The lost children of Nepal

The ChoraChori child rescue team needs your help!

The ChoraChori child rescue team is currently on a mission to retrieve more lost children of Nepal from India. Our colleagues went there to rescue 18 trafficked and displaced children from a children’s home in Bihar. But out of the blue the authorities have invited them to repatriate a further 14 Nepali kids from a second home. We urgently need your help. Read more:
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Rescuing Nepali boy Ashish from India

rickshaw2Fifteen year old Nepali boy Ashish ran away from home in 2015, travelling with a neighbour to find work and a better life in India. He travelled to Haryana state and worked in a food cart making chow mein and other snacks. But it turned out that his companion was an alcoholic who beat him often. So after three months Ashish ran away again, this time to Mumbai where the police picked him up and placed him in a children’s home where any attempt at escape would be punished with beating. Ultimately in early 2016 he was transferred to another home at Muzaffarpur in Bihar, north India.  From there he called his parents and asked them to come and free him. His father travelled to the home three times but on each occasion was turned away because release paperwork was not in order. Finally he went to Nepal’s Central Child Welfare Board to ask for help and the Board referred him to ChoraChori-Nepal. Last week Shailaja CM and Yogesh Dhami of the ChoraChori child rescue team journeyed with Ashish’s father to Bihar and this time there were no objections. Click on the image above to see the film of the release.

Ashish is very happy to be back home and says that he will never run away again. He realises now that his best chance of having a better life will come through a return to his studies. We’ll continue to support him all we can.

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Not one, but two appeals at Christmas! Sorry….

Earlier this year we reported on how we found a lost little Nepali boy in Delhi and brought him back to our refuge in Kathmandu. In spite of our best efforts through local and national media we have been unable to trace his parents. View our video below. Do any of our Nepali readers happen to recognise him? If so, please let us know.

Our Christmas Appeal has one week left to run and we are getting close to our target. Please help us to get there by making a small donation that will allow our vital work – child rescue, repatriation, reintegration, refuge care – to continue into 2017.

Many thanks.

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