Rescue from Varanasi

Kamala (green) and her father being counselled by ChoraChori-Nepal refuge manager, Rita Mokhtan (centre).

Varanasi is famous throughout India as a focus for pilgrims and tourists alike. Indeed, with its 2,000 temples it is known as the spiritual capital of India. But the ChoraChori-Nepal field team has just been there for another reason; to bring a girl trafficking victim home.

Sixteen year old Kamala (name changed) arrived at our Kathmandu refuge at midnight three days ago. It was the end of a long journey that began at the start of last year. At that time she was living at home in Rautahat, a District in south-central Nepal. She and a number of girls had been in touch by mobile with a boy who was encouraging them to join him in Kathmandu. Only Kamala decided to run away and join him, enticed by his proposal of marriage.

But once in Kathmandu the boy locked her in a room while he went to work in a bag factory. Soon afterwards they travelled to Nawalparasi, another border District, where again the boy locked her up while he sold ice lollipops on the street. From there they crossed the border in Uttar Pradesh and ended up in Varanasi. At this point Kamala begged to return home but the boy beat her and left saying he would return with a bus ticket. He never came back. The local Child Welfare Committee found out about Kamala’s predicament and admitted her to a girls’ hostel. Then they contacted ChoraChori-Nepal asking for our help with repatriation.

We managed to trace Kamala’s family without too much difficulty and her father and uncle travelled with our staff member Pratap Titung to secure her release.  At our Kathmandu refuge we have conducted health checks and counselled the family. Initially Kamala’s parents were saying that they would not accept her back home. Instead she would stay with an uncle pending marriage as soon as possible. However they have now come around to accepting her back with them, recognising that the girl has been a victim rather than a delinquent. Our next step is to find the boy and bring him to justice as this has been a case of trafficking.

Sadly, this is a story we hear all to often, with vulnerable girls being tempted by false promises. ChoraChori-Nepal is the only Nepal-based organisation that goes into India to retrieve and reintegrate them, giving girls like Kamala a second chance.

 

ChoraChori returns first group of rescued Nepalese children to their families

ChoraChori conducts medical checks on rescued Nepalese children at its Kathmandu refugeRescued Nepalese children returned to families

On the 17th March 2017 ChoraChori brought 33 trafficked and displaced Nepalese children back to Nepal. See this link. Working in conjunction with Nepal’s Central Child Welfare Board, we freed them from captivity in dreadful conditions at two children’s shelters in Bihar, north India. Since then we have been conducting basic medical checks on the children and, where necessary, providing essential medical care. We’ve also been finding out more about the children’s circumstances and how they ended up in India. And this past week we’ve successfully reunited the first nine of the returnees with their families.

Nepal’s Musahar community – the rat-catchers

These first nine children are from the Musahar caste. This word means “rat-catcher” or “rat-eater”. This caste lies within the “untouchable” community and the Musahar population straddles the border between India and Nepal. See this description of the Indian Musahar from Wikipedia. The 2014 Nepal census records 234,490 Musahar as living in Nepal. Their name stems from the belief that the people were so poor that they caught rats for food. That may not longer be the case but the Musahar still lead tough lives and experience terrible discrimination. As untouchables they are kept at the margins of society and may not share the same space as higher caste people. They undertake the most menial work and that includes, like their Bihari counterparts, going to north Indian States to find agricultural labour.

Caught in a trap

The nine children we returned to their homes in Siraha District told us of how, ironically, Musahar children find themselves in a trap. They have to attend separate schools, segregated from other children. Their school offered classes only up to the 5th grade. Further education would have involved transfer to a mixed caste school and that wasn’t allowed. So in desperation the children set off as a group to work  in a pizza shop in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Relatives who were working there already promised them a salary of 5,000 Indian rupees (£60) per month. The children left home with their parents’ permission but en route the Indian police intercepted them. The authorities placed them in Darbhanga children’s shelter where ChoraChori eventually rescued them.

Now these reunited children have no interest in education – it’s not available anyway. Instead they want to find work in Nepal or, when they are older, as migrant labour in the Middle East. One of the nine even wants to return to India once his citizenship papers are complete.  However bleak their prospects in life might be, at least these Nepalese children have the chance of a fresh start after their appalling experience as captives at Darbhanga children’s shelter.

Child trafficking

We are still researching the circumstances of the other rescued Nepalese children. Already there seems to be a significant child trafficking element involved. For obvious reasons we’ll not share anything on this while our investigations are underway. Also, two children are runaways from a Buddhist monastery in south India. They allege that they were being thrashed by the monks. This is not the first time that we have come across this allegation arising from a most unlikely place and this too requires our further research.

ChoraChori in the Nepali Times

Nepalese children captiveYesterday the Nepali Times published a powerful report on our joint operation with the Central Child Welfare Board. You can read this article and view the associated film by clicking on the image to the left.

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It’s as easy as clicking the button below. And just now we badly need your support to allow our vital work to continue. We have to rescue, rehabilitate and reunite many more Nepalese children from India. And there’s so much follow up required from this operation alone, including finding Nepalese child traffickers.

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ChoraChori rescues 33 Nepali kids from two Indian orphanages

ChoraChori rescues 33 Nepali kids in Bihar!

The picture above shows Narayan Bhatta thanking us for rescuing his son, Mahesh, along with 32 other Nepali kids from two children’s homes in India. Read more

Nepal’s lost children

The lost children of Nepal

The ChoraChori child rescue team needs your help!

The ChoraChori child rescue team is currently on a mission to retrieve more lost children of Nepal from India. Our colleagues went there to rescue 18 trafficked and displaced children from a children’s home in Bihar. But out of the blue the authorities have invited them to repatriate a further 14 Nepali kids from a second home. We urgently need your help. Read more:
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A boy trafficking survivor at our Kathmandu refuge

raju2

In Nepal the extended family is the fundamental social support network of an individual, be they child or adult. That’s how Raju (name changed) came to be looked after by his relatives after his mother’s death and his alcoholic father abandoning him at the age of nine. However, as is so often the case with child trafficking, close relatives can also betray a child’s trust.

It seemed like a dream come true when Raju’s aunt said that she’d take him to see his long-lost sister in India. But as soon as they arrived in Delhi his aunt sold him into domestic service, without his even getting to meet his sister. He became a slave for two years until a neighbour helped him escape by dropping him at the railway station. Before long the police picked him up and he was taken to a “shelter home”. That’s where ChoraChori’s field team found him in February this year and brought him back to Nepal. For now, and because it would be unsafe to return him to his family, he is staying at our Kathmandu refuge, from where he is attending the local school in the 5th grade.

Now Raju’s ambition is to complete his education and become a social activist like his rescuers. You can help him realise this dream by supporting our Christmas appeal using the button below. Many thanks.

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Boy on a bike

img_1445This is Sudip, age 12, who has just this week joined our Kathmandu refuge. He was picked up by the Kathmandu police cycling around on a rickety bicycle with no brakes (not a good idea on the Nepal roads) asking people for directions to Mahendranagar. This is a town in the far west of Nepal, 350 miles from Kathmandu! Sudip had been living there with his grandmother and two younger siblings, after his father left home (whereabouts unknown) and his mother having gone to Bangalore to work as a “masseuse”, taking Sudip’s 16 year old sister with her. Sudip’s cousin, a former policeman, had offered to take Sudip to his home in Kathmandu where he was promised a good education. Instead he found himself in domestic service (slavery) looking after his cousin’s children and working in his hotel for no payment. Sudip managed to befriend a local shopkeeper who gave him the small amount of money he needed to buy this old bike and escape. He’s now desperate to rejoin his grandmother.

This has been a case of trafficking – often a victim’s relative becomes their worst enemy – and slavery. ChoraChori will look after Sudip until we can trace the grandmother and reunite him and support his education. Please help us to support Sudip and others at our Kathmandu refuge through our Christmas Appeal. Thank you.

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The Tipling Girls

Seven excited girls have arrived in Kathmandu ready to start an education and training programme that is being launched by ChoraChori-Nepal. The girls, who are in the age range 17 to 19, come from Tipling, Dhading District. This is a remote part of west Nepal, quite close to the Tibet border, that was near the epicentre of the April 2015 earthquake. 98% of homes in their area were destroyed and the girls’ families are still living in makeshift tents. Three more girls from the area are due to join them soon, delayed in their travel because of landslides that have followed the arrival of this year’s monsoon.

Why these ten in the midst of so much need? They have been referred to us by our contact in Tipling, Father Norbert, who lives and teaches in the local school. The reason he has selected them is that all have passed the coveted 10th Grade School Leaver’s Certificate (SLC) examination, one of them at A+ standard, but there is no Higher Secondary (Grades 11 and 12) provision in the area. We feel these girls have more than earned the opportunity to continue with their studies. The alternative is early marriage – most of their peers are already married with babies – and there is a risk of being trafficked as all the girls are from the trafficking-prone Tamang community.

This project will run for three years, with a further ten girls due to join us in mid 2017. They will study but also have the chance to learn vocational skills after we reinstate a silver jewellery workshop from January next year. Those who show the aptitude and interest may take this up as their profession. For others we will teach business skills as a second string to their bow.

The girls have all settled well into their new situation in Godawari, been given pocket money and met with our very good supporter, Saroj KC, who is the Principal of the local Kitini School that they’ll be attending. The thing that is remarkable is that all the girls have been accommodated in the home of the Operational Director of ChoraChori-Nepal, Shailaja CM. Once again Shailaja is being welcoming and hospitable to young people in need – this makes her and us special!

If you would like to donate towards this project, here is the link.

Seven girls from Tipling Tipling girls cooking

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